Craig Eisele on …..

April 1, 2014

TV is not yet dead but some are writing it’s Obituary ….. at least in Canada.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Mr. Craig @ 5:05 am

Most people reading this will know that Re:Source Media’s head offices are in Toronto and so as proud Canadians we care about our domestic TV and online market. It just make sense as a media production and content creation company to know how and why, where and when people like to consume media. And so we were interested in this latest CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) report on the media habits of Canadians. And we think you will be too as it clearly highlights the global trend away from appointment viewing and into a world of on-demand, platform-independent consumption. We have long tried to be at the forefront of creating and delivering media to our audiences wherever and whenever they want it and as the changing habits of Canadians suggests, this is a good strategy.

This is the start of a significant change…

More and more Canadians are tuning into online movie streaming websites such as Netflix, but it has not impacted traditional television viewing as much as it eventually will according to the most recent CRTC report published last week.

The percentage of Canadians that subscribed to Netflix grew from 10 percent in 2011 to 17 percent in 2012, while the number of Canadian basic television subscribers increased by one percent to 12 million, according to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC)’s annual report.

Canada’s population is 35 million.

“More Canadians than ever are watching and listening to content on their computers, smartphones and tablets, yet the vast majority of programming is still accessed through traditional television and radio services,” CRTC Chairman Jean-Pierre Blais said in a statement.

The amount of time spent watching television was down only slightly from 2011, averaging 28.2 hours per week, according to the report.

Collectively, Canadians watched 931.3 million hours of television per week, nearly half of which were Canadian programs.

Meanwhile 33 percent of Canadians also or instead watched Internet television, typically about three hours per week, up slightly from the previous year.

Over the coming months, the CRTC will hold public consultations that could lead to an overall in the way Canadians watch television and the prices they pay for cable or satellite television services, with new regulations to follow.

No changes are expected that would impact online movie and television streaming services, after the CRTC twice rejected calls requiring Netflix to buy a broadcasting license, which helps fund Canadian productions.

In an interview with CBC Radio last week Blais commented that broadcasting is changing and will never be the same.

He noted that almost every Canadian household once had a television set in their living room, but now the trend is moving fast toward on-demand video content that is available on various devices, including tablets.

Other facts from the CRTC annual report:

– more than two out of four Canadians owned a smartphone and more than one out of four owned a tablet in 2012;

– Canadian families spent an average of Can$185 each month on communications services;

– Canadians downloaded an average of 28.4 gigabytes (GB) and uploaded 5.4 GB per month; and,

– there were 27.9 million Canadian wireless subscribers versus 11.9 million traditional telephones at home.

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: